UPDATE: Longport Dunes, Margate’s Outfall Pipe Dream for Summer 2018


Ugh. Margate beaches disrupted again for Summer 2018? We shall soon see as local leaders get closer to agreeing on a design & project plan for installing a city wide beach outfall pipe system.

The Army Corps of Engineers and the NJ DEP call it the Absecon Island Storm Damage Reduction Project. Others, like federal taxpayers and seashore homeowners, call it the 50 Year NJ Beach & Dune Swindle. We’re still in the first of those 5 decades of ‘make work’, where expensive, in-effective and easily eroded beach harms the fragile Jersey shore economy.

Margate Beach Disruption for Summer of 2018?

It could happen as another controversial project is poised for start on the once, wide-open beaches of Margate.

As of Dec. 2, 2017, we noted that a big chunk of the Margate dune work was not yet completed. But down in Longport, the Army Corp is racing through their dune building and beach widening work.

Contractors have completed 10 Longport blocks worth, north of 28th street. Outfall pipe structures are being installed in Longport. Does the Army Corp expect Longport drainage problems between bulkheads and dunes? Residents want more transparency from officials.

Head scratcher: why start the Longport dunes before finishing Margate? Logistics? Or, knowing how devious some are, it’s because the State & DEP want spring & summer work to be leverage in negotiations with Margate.

As of DEC 1, final outfall project design & plans have not been finalized & signed off on between Margate and the Army Corp & State.

Longport Dune and Beach Work


Mayor Becker of Margate thinks beach work will be stopped during the summer months. Well, that’s what the Army Corp said COULD happen.

The NJ DEP & Army Corp of Engineers seem to be accountable to no one.

Margate & Army Corp of Engineers. Perfect Together.

A major outfall pipe and drainage system could begin just after Jan. 2018. Steve Rochette of the Army Corps says this project could take 12 months. No decision to stop work during the summer months, Rochette said.

The Army Corp has been deviously strategic in negotiations with Margate, dangling ‘no summer work’ carrot.

According to Philly.com, Rochette said about no-summer work: “It’s being evaluated as part of the ongoing negotiations to complete the work. If it does not affect the cost or significantly increase the completion date of the work, we would expect work to stop for the summer of 2018.” As of Nov. 30, a final design and construction plan has not been signed off on.

According to Philly.com, Becker said he expected to see a final contract this week that includes a prohibition on summer work. He could not say what the city would do if the contract lacked such a provision. “From day one, we told them we don’t want them on our beaches.”

One Margate homeowner who asked for anonymity had this to say: Mayor Becker thinks the Army Corps will stop Margate beach work during the summer. LOL! As Ventnor’s Commisioner Landgraf tried last summer, chest pounding and idle threats in hopes of keeping NJ State off our beaches is pure fantasy. But it does make for good press and political posturing.

  •  As of 12/1/2017, the ACOE reports the dredge is undergoing repairs at the shipyard. Delays are expected.
  • ACOE is still developing a long-term storm water management design consisting of a street end drainage system and five ocean outfall pipes. Paid for by all federal taxpayers. Outfall construction could begin January 2018 if negotiations & design plans are agreed to soon. The project will take 12 months to complete.

The Army Corp hopes to stop construction on Margate beaches during Summer 2018, but that’s NOT a guarantee.

Marc Wiser says:  So, the ACOE is going to attempt to tie in 40+ street ends with each street end having 2 scuppers each. That’s at least 80 ties ins into some type of large Main pipe that will then somehow feed into 5 or so larger pipes that then feed down 600 feet into the ocean. LOL

Margate has 13 ft dunes straight down the middle of the beach, effectively cutting usable beach in half. Some fear, especially around the narrow beaches of Rumson Ave., that erosion will constrict and squeeze usable beach on the water side, during high tide.

All U.S. taxpayers will foot the bill for this Margate beach drainage and outfall pipe system.

The Army Corps of Engineers, along with the DEP and Governor Christie, pushed hard for the expensive project along the state’s 127-mile coastline. Congressman Frank LoBiondo, who has admitted to back bay flooding being the real culprit, played a major role in funding this effort.

Read more at Philly.com and AMY S. ROSENBERG

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